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Kanye’s bad reputation doesn’t represent his talent

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Was it the outrageous price of beer, the line it took to get inside or the two hour wait for the show to start that struck Golden 1 arena goers with anger and protest on Nov. 19 in 2016?

It was the devastating realization Kanye West was leaving the stage after 30 minutes of a few songs and a rant on politics. That realization was like a child noticing their scoop of rainbow sherbet had fallen from the cone.

The poor and oblivious child had spent so much time letting the frozen dessert soften because it was a bit too cold was like fans thinking “Oh he’ll stop the ranting and go back to the music that’ll get us all hyphy.” But much like the melted sherbet, once he was gone, he was gone.

The event caused a complete “I told you so” mentality by some of those who didn’t attend and those who just loathed West. This mentality came from the sheer thought West was obnoxiously arrogant and a faux paus like this was to be expected.

After thoughts of embarrassment and a complete lack of an understanding of the events – going as far as questioning existence, I clearly knew what happened. I had witnessed a mental breakdown.

The news was everywhere and whenever it’s brought up in conversation since then, it feels like I was in a fictional episode of  MTV’s “True Life: I witnessed Kanye 2016.”

I remember so many people yelling about how they refuse to listen to West ever again. I and a few friends of mine contemplated if it would be possible to respect and love his music again

About two months later I was back at it listening to “The Life of Pablo,” shedding a tear and feeling the heartbreak with each song Kanye performed.

Dramatics aside, one of my favorite artists ditched me and the rest of his Sacramento fans yet I still couldn’t lose my respect for Yeezus.

Regardless of how ridiculous he is, West is an insanely gifted man and has influenced the modern day rap genre and culture so much. Remember those ridiculous “shutter shades” sunglass with lines on the lenses? And now the holey tan sweaters and Yeezy shoes every shoe company is starting to replicate?

Hip-hop artist have tried numerous times to dare music and impact culture as much as West has. Chance the Rapper gained fame because of the support West gave him and is a self-proclaimed prodigy of West.

His music production alone is undeniably the best part. Albeit lyrics aren’t his strong suite because of the absurdity and love of mouth noises but West is more than aware of it. He has openly stated his emphasis on being a great producer rather than a great rapper.

His production is ever evolving. From “College Dropout” to “Graduation” his music was soulful, “808’s & Heartbreak” got electronic, “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” made hip-hop reach new heights with a gritty orchestra and so far everything post 2010 has been fused with rock and darker influences.

West is one of the few successful artists that continues to do what he wants with his music and that bravery needs to be admired. His antics are questionable but I will not deprive myself from the one-of-a-kind artist.

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Kanye’s bad reputation doesn’t represent his talent