Students ‘SpeedForce’ podcast serves fans of ‘The Flash’

Philip+Maynard+and+Anthony+Hernandez+during+the+%22SpeedForce%27+podcast

Courtesy Photo

Philip Maynard and Anthony Hernandez during the “SpeedForce’ podcast

For some fans, watching the latest episode of the CW’s “The Flash” isn’t enough. Luckily for them, there’s the “Speedforce” podcast, which focuses on all things related to “The Flash.” The podcast now has 68,000 total listeners and continues to climb.

Cosumnes River College students Philip Maynard, a 21-year-old film studies major, and Anthony Hernandez, a 22-year-old history major, started the superhero-themed podcast in September 2014.

“We talk about key things we want to mention and shout outs to people who help us,” Hernandez said. The two hosts were compelled to create this podcast because of their shared fandom for superheroes and the “DC-Comics” universe.

Maynard said he saw the advertisement for the CW’s series “The Flash,” then called his fellow host Hernandez, and told him “they’re doing a “Flash” show so we’re doing a podcast.”

The second season premiered on Oct. 6. “The Flash” is broadcast on the CW every Tuesday at 8 p.m. Speedforce has returned from the off season to find more easter eggs in the series.

The co-hosts record and post their podcasts to their site on Thursdays. Older shows can also be heard on their page.

Hernandez said he is a bigger fan of “The Flash,” but Maynard is no stranger to superheroes.

“I’m a huge superhero nerd on every front,” Maynard said.

He even wrote a novel about a high school for superheroes titled “The Eclipses: Freshman Fiasco,” which is available anywhere that e-books are sold.

His debut publication as an author was written for National Novel Writing Month in November. “NaNoWriMo” challenges authors to complete a novel within the month. Maynard said the novel was completed after only 26 days.

On the “Speedforce” podcast, Maynard and Hernandez take a deeper look at episodes so they can point listeners to the hidden “easter eggs,” or references the show’s creators try to sneak in as hidden tributes to the original comic books. But Maynard said they’re all about the fans.

“We try to get the entire fan base connected,” Maynard said. “That’s our main thing. We want to get the fans involved.”

One of those fans is Jason Ritter, a regular “Speedforce” listener and consistent email correspondent for the podcast.

“I really like the podcast because it provides good insight and fun theories about the show,” he said.

Ritter also said “Speedforce” has good interaction with their listeners.

Hernandez said he hopes one day future writers for comics, movies or other shows about “The Flash” will go back and listen to their commentaries as a research source.

“Ten years from now it could happen, it really could,” Hernandez said.

The podcasters have been featured on the local broadcast program “Good Morning Sacramento” twice and will most likely be returning this December for a third appearance.

“We’re local and we’re not doing this for money or fame,” Hernandez said. “It’s a fan podcast for the fans and we want to stay fan-oriented.”

When the show is off the air, Maynard said he and Hernandez review fan-chosen animated DC films.