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Split Decision: The tattoo and career debate rages on

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Rachel Norris and Shafa Ilyas

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Pro: Rachel Norris

Here we go again. The never-ending charade about how tattoos are tacky and do absolutely nothing for you, but diminish your self-image. Honestly, myself and many others are just about done with that argument.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, more than 45 million Americans have at least one tattoo, and that number is growing more and more everyday.

Tattoos are becoming more popular and society has become more accepting as generations go on, however, they are still looked down upon by certain employers, and in a lot of cases, are forbidden if you want certain jobs.

Just because I have tattoos doesn’t make me any less capable of getting a job done than the person without tattoos. The person with them may even perform better than the one without. So, why is society still basing job performance off of ink instead of skill?

Don’t discriminate against people with tattoos just because what they find beautiful is not what you consider beautiful. Are you going to reject me for a job because I don’t like the same music that you do? No, so why reject me for a job because I like tattoos and you don’t?

A lot of people don’t understand that tattoos provide more than just a stamp on our bodies. For some, tattoos are a source of remembrance, and for others, they express artistic and meaningful messages on a very personal level.

Rejecting a possible employee who has tattoos that are offensive and inappropriate is very understandable if you don’t want that person representing your business. But the fact that some employers reject possible employees just for having tattoos is ludicrous.

Another argument against getting ink on your body is that it will look ugly when you’re older and you can end up changing your mind and not liking it in a few years.

According to the Patient’s Guide reports, laser tattoo removal procedures climbed 32% from 2011 to 2012.

This is mainly due to the fact that people are just getting tattoos because they are becoming a huge trend in the U.S. and look “cool.” Only get a tattoo if it really means something to you, and never settle for a design that you do not absolutely love.

As for tattoos looking bad when you’re older, I don’t remember anyone looking great or trying to impress anybody when they are older. Sure, the tattoo is probably a bit faded, but that is a part of one’s life that provides meaningful insight into somebody’s character.

Tattoos can also set you apart from everyone else and provide a uniqueness to your self-image. I’m not saying you have to get tattoos if you want to be different, but many people get them because it pertains to some unique aspect of one’s life.

So stop judging people who have tattoos. They don’t judge you for not having them.

Con: Shafa Ilyas

In a matter of few minutes you could be a proud owner of a permanent tattoo on your body, however do not let the ease of getting tatted influence a big decision.

When getting a tattoo, dyes such as red,green,yellow and blue can cause an allergic reaction on the skin. This can lead to rashes on the tattoo, swelling, redness and even pain. Is it worth getting a tattoo that is just going to be surrounded with rashes and loathsome skin?

Despite the pain of getting stabbed with a needle over and over, getting a tattoo can risk acquiring a variance of diseases. According to a US News survey, approximately 30 percent of tattoo shops do not sterilize their tools. This leads to health risks such as infection, hepatitis and HIV. Diseases such as hepatitis and HIV can kill you with in the first few years of getting affected. No healthy human being should put their life on the line for simple body art, it’s not worth dying for.

Many disagree stating that permanently drawing on ones body is a form of art. This inexpensive form of self expression is a way to show loyalty with a person, group or an idea. Others believe that our natural body is a blank canvas, and adding tattoos enhances our beauty.

All the counter arguments against getting a tattoo are understandable to an extent. Getting a tattoo to advocate beliefs and show loyalty shows the passion one has. However, if a person is truly absorbed in that belief, then getting tatted will not increase the passion, will not make a person more loyal to the symbol of a tattoo and will not make anyone more of an individual. A person becomes an individual due to their thoughts and their actions, not because of a rebellious tattoo.

Many companies are loosening their tattoo policy or simple getting rid of them because they have become so common. Bank of America has no written policy against getting tatted. This is because they respect every person’s individuality. However Mayo Clinic, University of California: Los Angeles and Apollo Group all ask their employers to cover their tattoos. They believe in  strict professionalism.

Getting a tattoo when a person is young may seem trendy, however that is the same tattoo that a person will grow old with.

As life goes on, people change and so do a person’s interest. Time magazine reported that 16 percent of people regret getting a tattoo they got when they were younger.

It is very common to get tired of a tattoo. People grow older and learn from their mistakes. What interested a person when they were 16 may not interest them when they are 60.

The greatest setback for getting a tattoo is that it is permanent. There are numerous ways to get a tattoo removed, however after various treatments there is no certainty that it will be completely gone. The safest yet most expensive way to get a tattoo removed is to get laser surgery. It does not require cutting of any skin. The laser beam breaks the ink and then the human body naturally dissolves the ink.

This procedure is painful and can sometimes leave scars, blisters or scabs. Another way to remove a tattoo is for a doctor to simply cut the flesh the tattoo is on entirely. Then the doctor will sew up the skin which will cause scarring. Both of these treatments are far more expensive than the tattoo itself.

Tattoos look beautiful on the body, however one should think twice before making such an irreversible decision.

 

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1 Comment

One Response to “Split Decision: The tattoo and career debate rages on”

  1. The Tattoo Debate: Still Raging On? - CareerPlug on January 7th, 2015 9:37 am

    […] According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, more than 45 million Americans have at least one tattoo […]

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Split Decision: The tattoo and career debate rages on