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CAST artists paint the town, captivating public visitors

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Passionate brush strokes, intriguing angles and an infectious buzz filled the streets of downtown Sacramento for the Capital Artists’ Studio Tour.

Beginning in 2006 CAST, put on by the Center for Contemporary Art, has grown from a small number of art studios showcasing work to over 150 participating members.

The event is a self-guided tour through downtown and midtown Sacramento, supporting local artists and interest in art.

This year’s event  was split up into two packed weekends the first, occurring on Sept. 8 and 9, had a total of 132 participating artists and the following weekend holding 22.

Cosumnes River College’s very own art Professor, Margaret Woodcock, had her studio located south of the thriving William Land Park.

Woodcock has participated in CAST since 2006 and has enjoyed people coming through and “responding” to the lines and colors of her art.

She showcased her paintings and mixed-media art work out of her working studio nestled between her house and lush green garden.

“I like to garden. I like outdoor stuff so that tends to be my imagery,” Woodcock said. “I don’t have a set idea that I sketch out or paint towards, I literally just develop it as I’m working.”

Woodcock built all of her own wood panels as her starting block.  She works with the hard surface so she can really “push into and drag through it” with different media. From there she just starts putting on colors and collaging.

The Verge Center for the Arts is housed a short drive from Woodcock’s studio. This warehouse provides studios for over 30 unique artists and is open to educate the public in many art-related subjects. Hands-on experience in print art is also provided for tour-goers.

A brisk walk from the Verge Center, a pair of artists shared an underground studio down an alley on 10th Street. Marked only by a black door with “nicholaswray.com” spray painted in white on the side.

“For us we have gotten a lot of people down here who wouldn’t have normally come to our studio,” said Nicholas Wray, a 31-year-old professional and self-dubbed street photographer. “Just being able to show our stuff to the public who wouldn’t have normally seen it. I kind of enjoy it.”

Jason Bove, a 36-year-old abstract painter and studio-mate of Wray, enjoyed showcasing his work to the public and absorbing their advice, critiques and compliments.

“People have been really receptive,” Bove said.

Wray’s half of the studio consisted of black and white photos of street scenes presented on tall planks of plywood. To the left a photo of a bicycle tire and its shadow at an intriguing angle caught the eye.

A slide-show of his work was projected on a screen directly in front while his favorite Pandora station played in the background.

“I try to look at angles that aren’t typical. To me that’s what makes a photo different, and that is what makes it something that someone else can’t create, ” Wray said.

Bove had his colorful abstract paintings creatively placed along his space, coming off of the walls.  An old wood window stood above his desk that was comfortably cluttered with inspiring odds and ends.

Tourists could be found strolling around the entire town with cameras in hand while artists passionately presented their work and gave process demonstrations.

Those who visited gained an invaluable insight on how the art “just comes out,” explained by many artists.

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CAST artists paint the town, captivating public visitors